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2015-08-15

2015-08-15 09:47:25 by Henrik Grubbström (Grubba) <grubba@grubba.org>

Updated to tzdata2015f.

1235:      # west Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward I    - # From Paul Eggert (2006-03-22): + # From Brian Inglis (2015-07-20): + # From the historical weather station records available at: + # https://weatherspark.com/history/28351/1971/Sydney-Nova-Scotia-Canada + # Sydney shares the same time history as Glace Bay, so was + # likely to be the same across the island.... + # Sydney, as the capital and most populous location, or Cape Breton, would + # have been better names for the zone had we known this in 1996. +  + # From Paul Eggert (2015-07-20):   # Shanks & Pottenger write that since 1970 most of this region has been like   # Halifax. Many locales did not observe peacetime DST until 1972; - # Glace Bay, NS is the largest that we know of. + # the Cape Breton area, represented by Glace Bay, is the largest we know of + # (Glace Bay was perhaps not the best name choice but no point changing now).   # Shanks & Pottenger also write that Liverpool, NS was the only town   # in Canada to observe DST in 1971 but not 1970; for now we'll assume   # this is a typo.
1796:   # Exact date in October unknown; Sunday October 1 is a reasonable guess.   # 3. June 1918: switch to Pacific Daylight Time (GMT-7)   # Exact date in June unknown; Sunday June 2 is a reasonable guess. - # note#1: + # note 1:   # On Oct 27/1918 when daylight saving ended in the rest of Canada,   # Creston did not change its clocks. - # note#2: + # note 2:   # During WWII when the Federal Government legislated a mandatory clock change,   # Creston did not oblige. - # note#3: + # note 3:   # There is no guarantee that Creston will remain on Mountain Standard Time   # (UTC-7) forever.   # The subject was debated at least once this year by the town Council.