pike.git / lib / modules / Calendar.pmod / tzdata / australasia

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pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:1: - # @(#)australasia 7.61 + # @(#)australasia 7.68   # This file also includes Pacific islands.      # Notes are at the end of this file      ###############################################################################      # Australia    -  + # Please see the notes below for the controversy about "EST" versus "AEST" etc. +    # Rule NAME FROM TO TYPE IN ON AT SAVE LETTER/S   Rule Aus 1917 only - Jan 1 0:01 1:00 -   Rule Aus 1917 only - Mar 25 2:00 0 -   Rule Aus 1942 only - Jan 1 2:00 1:00 -   Rule Aus 1942 only - Mar 29 2:00 0 -   Rule Aus 1942 only - Sep 27 2:00 1:00 -   Rule Aus 1943 1944 - Mar lastSun 2:00 0 -   Rule Aus 1943 only - Oct 3 2:00 1:00 -   # Go with Whitman and the Australian National Standards Commission, which   # says W Australia didn't use DST in 1943/1944. Ignore Whitman's claim that
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:144:    10:00 AN EST   Zone Australia/Broken_Hill 9:25:48 - LMT 1895 Feb    10:00 - EST 1896 Aug 23    9:00 - CST 1899 May    9:30 Aus CST 1971    9:30 AN CST 2000    9:30 AS CST      # Lord Howe Island   # Rule NAME FROM TO TYPE IN ON AT SAVE LETTER/S - Rule LH 1981 1984 - Oct lastSun 2:00s 1:00 - - Rule LH 1982 1985 - Mar Sun>=1 2:00s 0 - - Rule LH 1985 only - Oct lastSun 2:00s 0:30 - - Rule LH 1986 1989 - Mar Sun>=15 2:00s 0 - - Rule LH 1986 only - Oct 19 2:00s 0:30 - - Rule LH 1987 1999 - Oct lastSun 2:00s 0:30 - - Rule LH 1990 1995 - Mar Sun>=1 2:00s 0 - - Rule LH 1996 max - Mar lastSun 2:00s 0 - - Rule LH 2000 only - Aug lastSun 2:00s 0:30 - - Rule LH 2001 max - Oct lastSun 2:00s 0:30 - + Rule LH 1981 1984 - Oct lastSun 2:00 1:00 - + Rule LH 1982 1985 - Mar Sun>=1 2:00 0 - + Rule LH 1985 only - Oct lastSun 2:00 0:30 - + Rule LH 1986 1989 - Mar Sun>=15 2:00 0 - + Rule LH 1986 only - Oct 19 2:00 0:30 - + Rule LH 1987 1999 - Oct lastSun 2:00 0:30 - + Rule LH 1990 1995 - Mar Sun>=1 2:00 0 - + Rule LH 1996 max - Mar lastSun 2:00 0 - + Rule LH 2000 only - Aug lastSun 2:00 0:30 - + Rule LH 2001 max - Oct lastSun 2:00 0:30 -   Zone Australia/Lord_Howe 10:36:20 - LMT 1895 Feb    10:00 - EST 1981 Mar    10:30 LH LHST      # Australian miscellany   #   # Ashmore Is, Cartier   # no indigenous inhabitants; only seasonal caretakers   # like Australia/Perth, says Turner   #
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:215:    -9:00 - GAMT # Gambier Time   Zone Pacific/Marquesas -9:18:00 - LMT 1912 Oct    -9:30 - MART # Marquesas Time   Zone Pacific/Tahiti -9:58:16 - LMT 1912 Oct # Papeete    -10:00 - TAHT # Tahiti Time   # Clipperton (near North America) is administered from French Polynesia;   # it is uninhabited.      # Guam   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL] - Zone Pacific/Guam 9:39:00 - LMT 1901 # Agana -  10:00 - GST + Zone Pacific/Guam -14:21:00 - LMT 1844 Dec 31 +  9:39:00 - LMT 1901 # Agana +  10:00 - GST 2000 Dec 23 # Guam +  10:00 - ChST # Chamorro Standard Time      # Kiribati   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Tarawa 11:32:04 - LMT 1901 # Bairiki    12:00 - GILT # Gilbert Is Time   Zone Pacific/Enderbury -11:24:20 - LMT 1901    -12:00 - PHOT 1979 Oct # Phoenix Is Time    -11:00 - PHOT 1995    13:00 - PHOT   Zone Pacific/Kiritimati -10:29:20 - LMT 1901    -10:40 - LINT 1979 Oct # Line Is Time    -10:00 - LINT 1995    14:00 - LINT      # N Mariana Is   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL] - Zone Pacific/Saipan 9:43:00 - LMT 1901 + Zone Pacific/Saipan -14:17:00 - LMT 1844 Dec 31 +  9:43:00 - LMT 1901    9:00 - MPT 1969 Oct # N Mariana Is Time -  10:00 - MPT +  10:00 - MPT 2000 Dec 23 +  10:00 - ChST # Chamorro Standard Time      # Marshall Is   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Majuro 11:24:48 - LMT 1901    11:00 - MHT 1969 Oct # Marshall Islands Time    12:00 - MHT   Zone Pacific/Kwajalein 11:09:20 - LMT 1901    11:00 - MHT 1969 Oct    -12:00 - KWAT 1993 Aug 20 # Kwajalein Time    12:00 - MHT
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:284:   # Shanks says the following was at 2:00; go with IATA.   Rule NC 1997 only - Mar 2 2:00s 0 -   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Noumea 11:05:48 - LMT 1912 Jan 13    11:00 NC NC%sT         ###############################################################################      # New Zealand + # + # From Paul Eggert (2002-10-23): + # The Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) maintains a brief history; + # see tz-link.htm for the full reference. + # + # Shanks gives 1868 for the introduction of standard time; go with the + # DIA's more-precise 1868-11-02. The DIA says that clocks were + # advanced by half an hour in 1941; go with Shanks's more-precise + # 1940-09-29 02:00. The DIA says that starting in 1933 DST began the + # first Sunday in September; go with Shanks's last Sunday starting in + # 1934.      # Rule NAME FROM TO TYPE IN ON AT SAVE LETTER/S   # Shanks gives 1927 Nov 6 - 1928 Mar 4, 1928 Oct 14 - 1929 Mar 17,   # 1929 Oct 13 - 1930 Mar 16; go with Whitman.   Rule NZ 1927 only - Nov 26 2:00 0:30 HD   Rule NZ 1928 1929 - Mar Sun>=1 2:00 0 S   Rule NZ 1928 only - Nov 4 2:00 0:30 HD   Rule NZ 1929 only - Oct 30 2:00 0:30 HD   Rule NZ 1930 1933 - Mar Sun>=15 2:00 0 S   Rule NZ 1930 1933 - Oct Sun>=8 2:00 0:30 HD   # Whitman says DST went on and off during war years, and the base UT offset   # didn't change until 1945 Apr 30; go with Shanks.   Rule NZ 1934 1940 - Apr lastSun 2:00 0 S   Rule NZ 1934 1939 - Sep lastSun 2:00 0:30 HD - Rule NZ 1974 only - Nov 3 2:00s 1:00 D + Rule NZ 1974 only - Nov Sun>=1 2:00s 1:00 D + Rule NZ 1975 only - Feb lastSun 2:00s 0 S   Rule NZ 1975 1988 - Oct lastSun 2:00s 1:00 D - Rule NZ 1989 only - Oct 8 2:00s 1:00 D - Rule NZ 1990 max - Oct Sun>=1 2:00s 1:00 D - Rule NZ 1975 only - Feb 23 2:00s 0 S +    Rule NZ 1976 1989 - Mar Sun>=1 2:00s 0 S -  + Rule NZ 1989 only - Oct Sun>=8 2:00s 1:00 D + Rule NZ 1990 max - Oct Sun>=1 2:00s 1:00 D   Rule NZ 1990 max - Mar Sun>=15 2:00s 0 S   Rule Chatham 1990 max - Oct Sun>=1 2:45s 1:00 D   Rule Chatham 1991 max - Mar Sun>=15 2:45s 0 S   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL] - Zone Pacific/Auckland 11:39:04 - LMT 1868 + Zone Pacific/Auckland 11:39:04 - LMT 1868 Nov 2    11:30 NZ NZ%sT 1940 Sep 29 2:00    12:00 NZ NZ%sT   Zone Pacific/Chatham 12:45 Chatham CHA%sT         # Auckland Is   # uninhabited; Maori and Moriori, colonial settlers, pastoralists, sealers,   # and scientific personnel have wintered      # Campbell I
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:348:    11:30 - NFT # Norfolk Time      # Palau (Belau)   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Palau 8:57:56 - LMT 1901 # Koror    9:00 - PWT # Palau Time      # Papua New Guinea   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Port_Moresby 9:48:40 - LMT 1880 -  9:48:40 - PMMT 1895 # Port Moresby Mean Time +  9:48:32 - PMMT 1895 # Port Moresby Mean Time    10:00 - PGT # Papua New Guinea Time      # Pitcairn   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Pitcairn -8:40:20 - LMT 1901 # Adamstown    -8:30 - PNT 1998 Apr 27 00:00    -8:00 - PST # Pitcairn Standard Time      # American Samoa   Zone Pacific/Pago_Pago 12:37:12 - LMT 1879 Jul 5
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:386:      # Tokelau Is   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Fakaofo -11:24:56 - LMT 1901    -10:00 - TKT # Tokelau Time      # Tonga   # Rule NAME FROM TO TYPE IN ON AT SAVE LETTER/S   Rule Tonga 1999 only - Oct 7 2:00s 1:00 S   Rule Tonga 2000 only - Mar 19 2:00s 0 - - Rule Tonga 2000 only - Nov 4 2:00s 1:00 S - Rule Tonga 2001 only - Jan 27 2:00s 0 - + Rule Tonga 2000 2001 - Nov Sun>=1 2:00 1:00 S + Rule Tonga 2001 2002 - Jan lastSun 2:00 0 -   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Tongatapu 12:19:20 - LMT 1901    12:20 - TOT 1941 # Tonga Time    13:00 - TOT 1999    13:00 Tonga TO%sT      # Tuvalu   # Zone NAME GMTOFF RULES FORMAT [UNTIL]   Zone Pacific/Funafuti 11:56:52 - LMT 1901    12:00 - TVT # Tuvalu Time
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:462:      # This data is by no means authoritative; if you think you know better,   # go ahead and edit the file (and please send any changes to   # tz@elsie.nci.nih.gov for general use in the future).      # From Paul Eggert <eggert@twinsun.com> (1999-10-29):   # A good source for time zone historical data outside the U.S. is   # Thomas G. Shanks, The International Atlas (5th edition),   # San Diego: ACS Publications, Inc. (1999).   # - # Gwillim Law <Gwil_Law@bridge-point.com> writes that a good source + # Gwillim Law writes that a good source   # for recent time zone data is the International Air Transport   # Association's Standard Schedules Information Manual (IATA SSIM),   # published semiannually. Law sent in several helpful summaries   # of the IATA's data after 1990.   #   # Except where otherwise noted, Shanks is the source for entries through 1990,   # and IATA SSIM is the source for entries after 1990.   #   # Another source occasionally used is Edward W. Whitman, World Time Differences,   # Whitman Publishing Co, 2 Niagara Av, Ealing, London (undated), which
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:487:   #   # I invented the abbreviations marked `*' in the following table;   # the rest are from earlier versions of this file, or from other sources.   # Corrections are welcome!   # std dst   # LMT Local Mean Time   # 8:00 WST WST Western Australia   # 9:00 JST Japan   # 9:30 CST CST Central Australia   # 10:00 EST EST Eastern Australia - # 10:00 GST Guam + # 10:00 ChST Chamorro   # 10:30 LHST LHST Lord Howe*   # 12:00 NZST NZDT New Zealand   # 12:45 CHAST CHADT Chatham*   # -11:00 SST Samoa   # -10:00 HST Hawaii   # - 8:00 PST Pitcairn*   #   # See the `northamerica' file for Hawaii.   # See the `southamerica' file for Easter I and the Galapagos Is.   
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:524:   # the phrase `summer time' and does not use the phrase `daylight   # time'.   # Announcers on the Commonwealth radio network, the ABC (for Australian   # Broadcasting Commission), use the phrases `Eastern Standard Time'   # or `Eastern Summer Time'. (Note, though, that as I say in the   # current australasia file, there is really no such thing.) Announcers   # on its overseas service, Radio Australia, use the same phrases   # prefixed by the word `Australian' when referring to local times;   # time announcements on that service, naturally enough, are made in UTC.    - # From Arthur David Olson (March 8 1992): + # From Arthur David Olson (1992-03-08):   # Given the above, what's chosen for year-round use is:   # CST for any place operating at a GMTOFF of 9:30   # WST for any place operating at a GMTOFF of 8:00   # EST for any place operating at a GMTOFF of 10:00    -  + # From Paul Eggert (2001-04-05), summarizing a long discussion about "EST" + # versus "AEST" etc.: + # + # I see the following points of dispute: + # + # * How important are unique time zone abbreviations? + # + # Here I tend to agree with the point (most recently made by Chris + # Newman) that unique abbreviations should not be essential for proper + # operation of software. We have other instances of ambiguity + # (e.g. "IST" denoting both "Israel Standard Time" and "Indian + # Standard Time"), and they are not likely to go away any time soon. + # In the old days, some software mistakenly relied on unique + # abbreviations, but this is becoming less true with time, and I don't + # think it's that important to cater to such software these days. + # + # On the other hand, there is another motivation for unambiguous + # abbreviations: it cuts down on human confusion. This is + # particularly true for Australia, where "EST" can mean one thing for + # time T and a different thing for time T plus 1 second. + # + # * Does the relevant legislation indicate which abbreviations should be used? + # + # Here I tend to think that things are a mess, just as they are in + # many other countries. We Americans are currently disagreeing about + # which abbreviation to use for the newly legislated Chamorro Standard + # Time, for example. + # + # Personally, I would prefer to use common practice; I would like to + # refer to legislation only for examples of common practice, or as a + # tiebreaker. + # + # * Do Australians more often use "Eastern Daylight Time" or "Eastern + # Summer Time"? Do they typically prefix the time zone names with + # the word "Australian"? + # + # My own impression is that both "Daylight Time" and "Summer Time" are + # common and are widely understood, but that "Summer Time" is more + # popular; and that the leading "A" is also common but is omitted more + # often than not. I just used AltaVista advanced search and got the + # following count of page hits: + # + # 1,103 "Eastern Summer Time" AND domain:au + # 971 "Australian Eastern Summer Time" AND domain:au + # 613 "Eastern Daylight Time" AND domain:au + # 127 "Australian Eastern Daylight Time" AND domain:au + # + # Here "Summer" seems quite a bit more popular than "Daylight", + # particularly when we know the time zone is Australian and not US, + # say. The "Australian" prefix seems to be popular for Eastern Summer + # Time, but unpopular for Eastern Daylight Time. + # + # For abbreviations, tools like AltaVista are less useful because of + # ambiguity. Many hits are not really time zones, unfortunately, and + # many hits denote US time zones and not Australian ones. But here + # are the hit counts anyway: + # + # 161,304 "EST" and domain:au + # 25,156 "EDT" and domain:au + # 18,263 "AEST" and domain:au + # 10,416 "AEDT" and domain:au + # + # 14,538 "CST" and domain:au + # 5,728 "CDT" and domain:au + # 176 "ACST" and domain:au + # 29 "ACDT" and domain:au + # + # 7,539 "WST" and domain:au + # 68 "AWST" and domain:au + # + # This data suggest that Australians tend to omit the "A" prefix in + # practice. The situation for "ST" versus "DT" is less clear, given + # the ambiguities involved. + # + # * How do Australians feel about the abbreviations in the tz database? + # + # If you just count Australians on this list, I count 2 in favor and 3 + # against. One of the "against" votes (David Keegel) counseled delay, + # saying that both AEST/AEDT and EST/EST are widely used and + # understood in Australia. +    # From Paul Eggert (1995-12-19):   # Shanks reports 2:00 for all autumn changes in Australia and New Zealand.   # Mark Prior <mrp@itd.adelaide.edu.au> writes that his newspaper   # reports that NSW's fall 1995 change will occur at 2:00,   # but Robert Elz says it's been 3:00 in Victoria since 1970   # and perhaps the newspaper's `2:00' is referring to standard time.   # For now we'll continue to assume 2:00s for changes since 1960.      # From Eric Ulevik <eau@zip.com.au> (1998-01-05):   #
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:644:   # ...there was recently a referendum in Queensland which resulted   # in the experimental daylight saving system being abandoned. So, ...   # ...   # Rule QLD 1989 1991 - Oct lastSun 2:00 1:00 D   # Rule QLD 1990 1992 - Mar Sun>=1 3:00 0 S   # ...      # From Arthur David Olson (1992-03-08):   # The chosen rules the union of the 1971/1972 change and the 1989-1992 changes.    + # From Rives McDow (2002-04-09): + # The most interesting region I have found consists of three towns on the + # southern coast of Australia, population 10 at last report, along with + # 50,000 sheep, about 100 kilometers long and 40 kilometers into the + # continent. The primary town is Madura, with the other towns being + # Mundrabilla and Eucla. According to the sheriff of Madura, the + # residents got tired of having to change the time so often, as they are + # located in a strip overlapping the border of South Australia and Western + # Australia. South Australia observes daylight saving time; Western + # Australia does not. The two states are one and a half hours apart. The + # residents decided to forget about this nonsense of changing the clock so + # much and set the local time 20 hours and 45 minutes from the + # international date line, or right in the middle of the time of South + # Australia and Western Australia. As it only affects about 10 people and + # tourists staying at the Madura Motel, it has never really made as big an + # impact as Broken Hill. However, as tourist visiting there or anyone + # calling the local sheriff will attest, they do keep time in this way. + # + # From Paul Eggert (2002-04-09): + # This is confirmed by the section entitled + # "What's the deal with time zones???" in + # <http://www.earthsci.unimelb.edu.au/~awatkins/null.html>, + # which says a few other things: + # + # * Border Village, SA also is 45 minutes ahead of Perth. + # * The locals call this time zone "central W.A. Time" (presumably "CWAT"). + # * The locals also call Western Australia time "Perth time". + # + # It's not clear from context whether everyone in Western Australia + # knows of this naming convention, or whether it's just the people in + # this subregion. +    # South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria      # From Arthur David Olson (1992-03-08):   # The rules from version 7.1 follow.   # There are lots of differences between these rules and   # the Shepherd et al. rules. Since the Shepherd et al. rules   # and Bradley White's newspaper article are in agreement on   # current DST ending dates, no worries.   #   # Rule Oz 1971 1985 - Oct lastSun 2:00 1:00 -
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:745:   # Sim Alam (2000-07-03) reported a legal citation for the 2000/2001 rules:   # http://www.thelaw.tas.gov.au/fragview/42++1968+GS3A@EN+2000070300      # Victoria      # The rules for 1971 through 1991 were reported by George Shepherd   # via Simon Woodhead via Robert Elz (1991-03-06):   # # The state of VICTORIA.. [ Courtesy of Vic. Dept of Premier + Cabinet ]   # # [ Nov 1990 ]    + # From Scott Harrington (2001-08-29): + # On KQED's "City Arts and Lectures" program last night I heard an + # interesting story about daylight savings time. Dr. John Heilbron was + # discussing his book "The Sun in the Church: Cathedrals as Solar + # Observatories"[1], and in particular the Shrine of Remembrance[2] located + # in Melbourne, Australia. + # + # Apparently the shrine's main purpose is a beam of sunlight which + # illuminates a special spot on the floor at the 11th hour of the 11th day + # of the 11th month (Remembrance Day) every year in memory of Australia's + # fallen WWI soldiers. And if you go there on Nov. 11, at 11am local time, + # you will indeed see the sunbeam illuminate the special spot at the + # expected time. + # + # However, that is only because of some special mirror contraption that had + # to be employed, since due to daylight savings time, the true solar time of + # the remembrance moment occurs one hour later (or earlier?). Perhaps + # someone with more information on this jury-rig can tell us more. + # + # [1] http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog/HEISUN.html + # [2] http://www.shrine.org.au +    # New South Wales      # From Arthur David Olson:   # New South Wales and subjurisdictions have their own ideas of a fun time.   # Based on law library research by John Mackin (john@basser.cs.su.oz),   # who notes:   # In Australia, time is not legislated federally, but rather by the   # individual states. Thus, while such terms as ``Eastern Standard Time''   # [I mean, of course, Australian EST, not any other kind] are in common   # use, _they have NO REAL MEANING_, as they are not defined in the
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:869:   # arrangements. The starting date for summer time on the Island will   # however always coincide with the rest of NSW.      # From James Lonergan, Secretary, Lord Howe Island Board (2000-10-25):   # Lord Howe Island advances clocks by 30 minutes during DST in NSW and retards   # clocks by 30 minutes when DST finishes. Since DST was most recently   # introduced in NSW, the "changeover" time on the Island has been 02:00 as   # shown on clocks on LHI. I guess this means that for 30 minutes at the start   # of DST, LHI is actually 1 hour ahead of the rest of NSW.    - # From Paul Eggert (2000-10-25): - # For Lord Howe we use Shanks through 1989, and Lonergan thereafter, + # From Paul Eggert (2001-02-09): + # For Lord Howe dates we use Shanks through 1989, and Lonergan thereafter. + # For times we use Lonergan.      ###############################################################################      # New Zealand      # From Mark Davies (1990-10-03):   # the 1989/90 year was a trial of an extended "daylight saving" period.   # This trial was deemed successful and the extended period adopted for   # subsequent years (with the addition of a further week at the start).   # source -- phone call to Ministry of Internal Affairs Head Office.
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:967:   # 1993-08-20. Thursday night at midnight Kwajalein switched sides with   # respect to the International Date Line, to rejoin its fellow islands,   # going from 11:59 p.m. Thursday to 12:00 m. Saturday in a blink.         # N Mariana Is, Guam      # Howse writes (p 153) ``The Spaniards, on the other hand, reached the   # Philippines and the Ladrones from America,'' and implies that the Ladrones   # (now called the Marianas) kept American date for quite some time. - # Ignore this for now, as we have no hard data. See also Asia/Manila. + # For now, we assume the Ladrones switched at the same time as the Philippines; + # see Asia/Manila.    -  + # US Public Law 106-564 (2000-12-23) made UTC+10 the official standard time, + # under the name "Chamorro Standard Time". There is no official abbreviation, + # but Congressman Robert A. Underwood, author of the bill that became law, + # wrote in a press release (2000-12-27) that he will seek the use of "ChST".    -  +    # Micronesia      # Alan Eugene Davis <adavis@kuentos.guam.net> writes (1996-03-16),   # ``I am certain, having lived there for the past decade, that "Truk"   # (now properly known as Chuuk) ... is in the time zone GMT+10.''   #   # Shanks writes that Truk switched from UTC+10 to UTC+11 on 1978-10-01;   # ignore this for now.      # From Paul Eggert (1999-10-29):
pike.git/lib/modules/Calendar.pmod/tzdata/australasia:1102:   # Back in March I found a notice on the website http://www.tongaonline.com   # that Tonga changed back to standard time one month early, on March 19   # instead of the original reported date April 16. Unfortunately, the article   # is no longer available on the site, and I did not make a copy of the   # text, and I have forgotten to report it here.   # (Original URL was: http://www.tongaonline.com/news/march162000.htm )      # From Rives McDow (2000-12-01):   # Tonga is observing DST as of 2000-11-04 and will stop on 2001-01-27.    + # From Sione Moala-Mafi (2001-09-20) via Rives McDow: + # At 2:00am on the first Sunday of November, the standard time in the Kingdom + # shall be moved forward by one hour to 3:00am. At 2:00am on the last Sunday + # of January the standard time in the Kingdom shall be moved backward by one + # hour to 1:00am. +  + # From Pulu 'Anau (2002-11-05): + # The law was for 3 years, supposedly to get renewed. It wasn't. +    ###############################################################################      # The International Date Line      # From Gwillim Law (2000-01-03):   #   # The International Date Line is not defined by any international standard,   # convention, or treaty. Mapmakers are free to draw it as they please.   # Reputable mapmakers will simply ensure that every point of land appears on   # the correct side of the IDL, according to the date legally observed there.